Weekly Crime Reports – Tuesday 16th May 2017

May 16, 2017
By

NHW NEWS

We held our 13th AGM and Conference for the Uttlesford Steering Group in Thaxted yesterday. The Officers for the coming year are:
Alan Johnson – Chair
Graham Jackson – Vice Chair
Derrick Giffin – Treasurer
Rebecca King – Treasurer

During the Conference we had three guest speakers from Essex Police; Insp Mick Couldridge for Uttlesford & Braintree Community Policing; Stephen Armston-Smith from Crime Reduction; and D Insp Lee Morton from Kent & Essex Serious Crime Unit who spoke about Cybercrime. The presentation slides used by Lee will be posted on www.uttlesfordnhw.org.uk along with the Chair’s Report.

CRIME REPORTS (supplied by Essex Police)

CRIMINAL DAMAGE TO A MOTOR VEHICLE 42/67260/17
Birchanger, Dunmow Road – On 6th May
A VANDAL HAS CAUSED DAMAGE TO THE VICTIM’S CAR BY KICKING THE DOOR.

CRIMINALDAMAGE 42/67882/17
Birchanger, Harrisons – Between 1st June 2016 and 5th May
SOMEONE HAS CAUSED CRIMINAL DAMAGE TO VICTIMS GARAGE WALL BY DRILLING HIS GATE POSTS INTO THE GARAGE WALL AND ATTACHING SCAFFOLDING TO THE GARAGE.

THEFT FROM A MOTOR VEHICLE 42/68260/17
Birchanger, Reeve Road – Between 8th and 12th May
THIEVES HAVE REMOVED THE VICTIMS FRONT NUMBER PLATE FROM HIS FORD FIESTA

BURGLARY – RESIDENTIAL  42/65520/17
Eastons, Duck Street – Between 5th and 6th May
THIEVES HAVE ENTERED THE VICTIM’S INSECURE GARAGE BY PULLING UP THE ROLLER DOOR. ONCE INSIDE THE GARAGE SUSPECTS HAVE STOLEN A CHILD’S MOTOR CYCLE, POWER TOOLS AND HAVE USED A CROW BAR TO OPEN A TIN OF PAINT AND POUR IT OVER THE VICTIMS PEDAL CYCLES

BURGLARY – RESIDENTIAL 42/67718/17
Eastons, Duck Street – Overnight on 10th May
THIEVES HAVE GAINED ENTRY TO THE VICTIMS SECURE SHED BY REMOVING THE SCREWS FROM THE DOOR. ONCE INSIDE HAVE COMPLETED A TIDY SEARCH OF THE SHED. ITEMS REMOVED WERE FOUND NEARBY.

BURGLARY – RESIDENTIAL 42/66411/17
Eastons, Sucksted Green – Between 5th and 8th May
A THIEF HAS ATTEMPTED TO JEMMY THE SIDE DOOR WITHOUT SUCCESS. SUSPECT HAS THEN JEMMIED ONE OF THE TWO FRONT BARN STYLE DOORS. TIDY SEARCH MADE AND ITEMS REMOVED

CRIMINAL DAMAGE 42/68280/17
Elsenham and Henham, Stansted Road – Between 10th and 11th May
A VANDAL HAS PUSHED OVER TWO POSTS CAUSING DAMAGE TO THE POSTS

BURGLARY – RESIDENTIAL  42/65704/17
Elsenham and Henham, Robin Hood Road – Late morning on 6th May
A THIEF HAS USED A SCREWDRIVER TO FORCE OPEN THE FRONT DOOR AND WHILST THE VICTIM WENT TO THE FRONT DOOR THE SUSPECT HAS ENTERED THE KITCHEN. SUSPECT HAS RUN OFF AFTER SEEING THE VICTIM

THEFT FROM A MOTOR VEHICLE 42/67693/17
Stansted, Church Road – Between 9th and 10th May
THIEVES HAVE CAUSED DAMAGE TO THE VICTIMS SECURE FORD TRANSIT BY USING A METAL PADLOCK TO THROW THROUGH THE FRONT OFFSIDE WINDOW CAUSING THE GLASS TO SHATTER AND ALSO ATTEMPTED TO THROW IT THROUGH THE WINDSCREEN CAUSING THE GLASS TO CRACK. ONCE INSIDE THE SUSPECTS HAVE COMPLETED A MESSY SEARCH OF THE INTERIOR REMOVING A NUMBER OF ITEMS.

THEFT OF A MOTOR VEHICLE 42/65490/17
Stansted, Brook View – Overnight on 5th May
SUSPECTS UNKNOWN HAVE REMOVED THE VICTIMS WHITE FORD TRANSIT

CRIMINAL DAMAGE 42/66687/17
Stansted, Spencer Close – On 8th May
A VANDAL HAS USED A SHARP INSTRUMENT TO SCRATCH THE SIDE OF THE VICTIMS NISSAN QASHQAI

CRIME REDUCTION ADVICE (supplied by Action Fraud and Essex Police)

Following the ransomware cyber attack on Friday 12 May which affected the NHS and is believed to have affected other organisations globally, the City of London Police’s National Fraud Intelligence Bureau has issued an alert urging both individuals and businesses to follow protection advice immediately and in the coming days.

Ransomware is a form of malicious software (Malware) that enables cyber criminals to remotely lock down files on your computer or mobile device. Criminals will use ransomware to extort money from you (a ransom), before they restore access to your files. There are many ways that ransomware can infect your device, whether it be a link to a malicious website in an unsolicited email, or through a security vulnerability in a piece of software you use.

Key Protect messages for businesses to protect themselves from ransomware:
• Install system and application updates on all devices as soon as they become available.
• Install anti-virus software on all devices and keep it updated.
• Create regular backups of your important files to a device that isn’t left connected to your network as any malware infection could spread to that too.

The National Cyber Security Centre’s technical guidance includes specific software patches to use that will prevent uninfected computers on your network from becoming infected with the “WannaCry” Ransomware: https://www.ncsc.gov.uk/guidance/ransomware-latest-ncsc-guidance

For additional in-depth technical guidance on how to protect your organisation from ransomware, details can be found here: https://www.ncsc.gov.uk/guidance/protecting-your-organisation-ransomware

Key Protect advice for individuals:
• Install system and application updates on all devices as soon as they become available.
• Install anti-virus software on all devices and keep it updated.
• Create regular backups of your important files to a device (such as an external hard drive or memory stick) that isn’t left connected to your computer as any malware infection could spread to that too.
• Only install apps from official app stores, such as Google’s Play Store, or Apple’s App Store as they offer better levels of protection than some 3rd party  stores. Jailbreaking, rooting, or disabling any of the default security features of your device will make it more susceptible to malware infections.

Phishing/smishing
Fraudsters may exploit this high profile incident and use it as part of phishing/smishing campaigns. We urge people to be cautious if they receive any unsolicited communications from the NHS. The protect advice for that is the following:
• An email address can be spoofed. Don’t open attachments or click on the links within any unsolicited emails you receive, and never respond to emails that ask for your personal or financial details.
• The sender’s name and number in a text message can be spoofed, so even if the message appears to be from an organisation you know of, you should still exercise caution, particularly if the texts are asking you to click on a link or call a number.

Don’t disclose your personal or financial details during a cold call, and remember that the police and banks will never ring you and ask you to verify your PIN, withdraw your cash, or transfer your money to another “safe” account.

If you have been a victim of fraud or cyber crime, please report it to Action Fraud at http://www.actionfraud.police.uk/

“Warm Night” – Some Crime Prevention advice for the home

In medieval times as night time approached the castle draw bridge was raised, the portcullis dropped, and the sentry stationed at the gate would not let anyone in unchallenged. Now whilst the drawbridge and portcullis would be a bit over the top, at the average home there are a few simple things you can do on these hot summers nights to prevent you from becoming a victim of crime.

First line of defence, where possible prevent an intruder from getting to the rear of your property (most burglary point of entries occur at the rear of the property) with a 6’ fence and gate, consider a spiky topping (perfectly legal but must have a warning sign displayed), and make sure it is closed and locked especially at night.

If you have unoccupied rooms that can be accessed from outside make sure the windows are closed, if you need ventilation in these rooms at least lock the larger window and only have the small window open, even during the daytime. Naturally if the house is empty all windows should closed.

Leave a door or patio door open and in comes trouble, even during the day if that door is accessible the sneak thief will pop in and anything laying around will be gone, you may have only popped down the end of the garden or having a quick shower upstairs, it only takes a second.

Before you turn in for the night do the “rounds” some may think it is a bit over the top, but you will feel more confident and not become a victim of “the one time I forgot to shut the window……” Check the simple things:-

• Cars on the drive? – are the windows shut and doors locked (don’t assume that by pressing the button on the remote it is locked, try the handle too)? It is worth parking the least expensive car in front of the more expensive one.
• Side gate shut and locked, sheds and garages secure?
• Doors closed and locked, don’t forget on that UPVC multi-locking door you may have lifted the handle but until you turn the key you have not locked all the locks in place.
• Don’t forget to check that patio door, someone may have closed it but did they lock it?
• Windows, lift the blinds or open the curtains and check them, the sun may have been on the TV so they were drawn with the window open because it was hot. Ensure all accessible windows are closed and locked, if you live in a bungalow or have flat roofs, in unoccupied rooms keep them closed and locked but if you need a window open for ventilation in occupied rooms as above lock the big window and just have the small one open. If you only have bigger windows consider a lockable window restrictor or a small sensor alarm at the window to detect entry.
• Check unnecessary appliances are turned off, and make sure in case of fire that keys are readily accessible to occupants but not in view of possible burglars.
• If you have an alarm activate the zone for the unoccupied area.
• Car keys, don’t take them to bed with you, where possible leave them in noisy drawer/location.
• If you do hear a suspicious noise in the house that you are not happy with dial 999, if you have an intruder remember your life is more important than your property, but do get a good description and if possible car index number.

Last bit of advice, going on holiday? Stop the milk and newspaper deliveries and look after each other, get a neighbour and/or friend to keep an eye on your property, ensure neighbours have contact numbers for a key holder and where possible let them park their car on your drive, in the house lights on timers, Fake TV etc. Basically, if you create the illusion that your house is occupied it is less likely to be broken into. Lastly curtains closed during the day, or partially closed at any time say that I am away.

If would like Crime Reduction advice please don’t hesitate to contact me via the non-emergency telephone number 101 or look at the Essex Police website for more general advice.

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